The role of testosterone in the teeth and mouth

Sex hormones have a biological role in various tissues of the body. Androgen receptors can be found not only in classical organs dependent on androgens, such as muscle, prostate, seminal vesica, epididymis and testes, but also almost all tissues, such as the hypothalamus, pituitary, kidneys, spleen, heart, sweat glands, and etc. Androgen receptors have also been detected in gingival and periodontal tissues1. Testosterone either directly or indirectly has been reported to be required for normal craniofacial growth patterns. The role of testosterone in periodontal tissue and tooth loss is Hypogonadism has been associated with bone mass loss and fracture risk. Low estradiol levels are associated with reduced bone trabecular mass, cortical thickness, cortical density, and trabecular thickness. Thus, it is plausible that testosterone through its metabolites, estradiol also affects the jaw bone metabolism which may further cause periodontitis and tooth loss. For men, the role of this hormone is very important and a reference for them to grow and develop and build muscle in the future, how you can keep this hormone condition is still good is one with a healthy life and accompanied by a supplement that you can get in testogen Walmart.

Singh et al conducted a study involving 203 men aged 30-65 in India with moderate chronic periodontitis, measuring the average testosterone and bone mass density, and comparing it to tooth loss conditions. Also analyzed value limits testosterone levels and bone mass density that can predict tooth loss. There were significant differences in mean testosterone levels in all three groups with different tooth loss criteria. In a cross-sectional study, it was reported that tooth loss was significantly correlated with decreased testosterone in men.

This loss of teeth is supported by the fact that the decrease in testosterone can affect the occurrence of periodontitis. But an observational cohort study by Orwoll, in 5995 men aged 65 years or older during the 2000-2002 period showed that there was no evidence that serum sex steroid levels were associated with periodontal disease and its development, the number of teeth in the initial data and the incidence of tooth loss. These three studies have limitations. Singh simply based his opinion on the cause of his teeth date. The study by Orwoll et al was conducted only in the elderly, volunteers with good health and economic-social status, so it did not represent the entire parental population. The study population only involves caucasian, so it cannot be generalized to other races.

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